Vetiver & Tulsi Herbally Dyed Bedding

Vetiver & Tulsi

These sheets are dyed with a range of herbs used in traditional Indian medicine system known as Ayurveda.

The herbs have been selected for their general beneficial properties that are good for skin, body and soul and are used traditionally to help calm anxiety..

Herbs include

Tulsi  -  has been used for thousands of years in Ayurveda for its diverse healing properties. It is mentioned in the Charaka Samhita, an ancient Ayurvedic text. Tulsi is considered to be an adaptogen, balancing different processes in the body, and helpful for adapting to stress. Marked by its strong aroma and astringent taste, it is regarded in Ayurveda as a kind of "elixir of life" and believed to promote longevity.

Cultivation of tulsi plants has both spiritual and practical significance that connects the grower to the creative powers of nature, and organic cultivation offers solutions for food security, rural poverty, hunger, environmental degradation and climate change. The use of tulsi in daily rituals is a testament to Ayurvedic wisdom and provides an example of ancient knowledge offering solutions to modern problems.

Vetiver - Vetiver is famous all over the Indian Subcontinent. People may not understand it since many of them are unfamiliar with this name. Instead, it is popularly known “Khus” or “Khus-Khus” and it is extensively used in perfumes, food and beverage industries.

The botanical name of vetiver is Vetiveria Zizanoides or Andropogon Muricatus. This grass has a very pleasant, mild, earthy, and musky smell which has a cooling effect on the body and the mind. The dried grass and its roots are used to thatch the side panels of the water based room and window coolers since it cools and adds fragrance to the moist air.

It is also used to thatch roofs of earthen houses and mattresses. It is also used as curtains on the doors and windows, which, apart from cooling and scenting the rooms, keeps insects away. That is why its demand rises excessively during the summer, particularly in humid regions like India and neighboring countries.

Vayambu, Sweet Flag or Calamus – The Bible mentions its use in the holy anointing oil ( Exodus 30: 23).  In Britain the plant was cut for use as a sweet smelling floor covering for the packed earth floors of dwellings and churches, and stacks of rushes have been used as the centrepiece of rushbearing ceremonies for many hundreds of years. It has also been used as a thatching material for English cottages.

In modern Egypt it is thought to have aphrodisiac properties.

 For the Penobscot people this was a very important root. One story goes that a sickness was plaguing the people. A muskrat spirit came to a man in a dream, telling him that he (the muskrat) was a root and where to find him. The man awoke, found the root, and made a medicine which cured the people. In Penobscot homes, pieces of the dried root were strung together and hung up for preservation. Steaming it throughout the home was thought to "kill" sickness. While they were travelling, a piece of root was kept and chewed to ward off illness.

Teton-Dakota warriors chewed the root to a paste, which they rubbed on their faces. It was thought to prevent excitement and fear when facing an enemy. The Potawatomi people powdered the dried root and placed this up the nose to cure catarrh.

On 5 May Japanese prepare a bath with hashōbu leaves (shōbu-yu) for children to promote good health and to ward-off evil. In the Japanese calendar the day is known as Ayame no sekku (菖蒲の節句, the iris festival)

Galanga Root (kah): Galanga, called kah in Thai and known variously as "galangal" and "laos root," is an immensely pungent and fiery rhizome related to the common ginger but with a personality distinctly its own.

The name galangal is derived form the Chinese word for ginger. Botanically it is known as alpinia galanga. This tuber is known to have numerous medicinal and health benefits. And sit is used by many homeopaths and healthcare professionals.